Can Adding a Second Layer of Roofing Do More Harm Than Good?

Roofer repairing the roof

Roofer repairing the roofSome areas allow the installation of a second layer of roofing materials. This strategy can save you money because skipping the tear-off part dramatically reduces the cost of labor. However, experienced Maryland roofing contractors don’t always recommend it for great reasons.

Here are the worst consequences of choosing not to strip away the old materials:

Having No Way to Fix Damaged Roof Deck Completely

Installing another layer of roofing materials is a huge gamble because it keeps your contractor from inspecting and repairing the wood decking and flashing underneath. Any damage to your roof’s foundation can lead to droops, while broken flashings make your home easily vulnerable to water infiltration. If they cause leakage at some point, professional roofers might have to remove everything to install new sheets of plywood and strips of flashing.

Adding Too Much Weight to Your Home to Bear

The collective weight of two layers of roofing materials can spell disaster. It can exceed the amount of heat your home could support, increasing the chance of your roof to cave in. If your roof collapses because of material overload, your insurance company may compensate you for your losses.

Nullifying Your Replacement Material’s Warranty

Putting a new roof over your old one may shorten or void your warranty completely. Having multiple layers of materials can affect your roof’s ability to expel heat. In turn, your new asphalt shingles would age fast and cause them to curl or cup. Shingle bulging paves the way for water seepage.

Even if your local building code allows you to install a second layer of roofing materials to your home, strongly consider its disadvantages. You may save a little at first, but any major failure related to it may increase the need for replacement. An experienced roofer can conduct an inspection and determine whether this project is viable.