Frost Protection: Keep Your Garden Safe from the Cold

Frosted hawthorn berries in the gardenSalt Lake City’s sees 3095 hours of sunshine with an average snowfall of 47 inches. It gets cold in this part of Utah, which means exposing your lawn and garden to harsh temperatures. Fortunately, you can protect your yard from root damage and other ill-effects of frost.

Here’s how to do it:

Hire a weed control service

You may not realize this, but the presence of weeds actually does more than just suck in the soil’s nutrients that are supposed to be for your plants. It also increases frost risk for the entire garden. This is why when it is not snowing, you need to minimize the impact of weeds in your garden. You can take care of lawn weed control with a Salt Lake City service.

Cover plants with frost cloths

Frost cloths are effective insulators, which means that they will help retain more heat. If you do not have frost cloths, you can use old bed sheets, newspapers and even straw as alternatives.

Use temporary cloches for your vegetable garden

If you’ve got an edible garden, use temporary cloches to protect your crops. You can use a plastic cover with a sturdy frame for raised beds or repurposed jugs for individual plants.

Warm plants with water

Fill your water jugs with lukewarm water and use this to water your plants. This will help your plants withstand the cold more than it gives them a bit of heat.

Avoid sowing seeds in frost pockets

Frost pockets are what you call the depressions in the ground that will most likely form frosts because cold air and water cannot escape. As much as possible, do not sow seeds or plant flowers in these low areas.

Some plants and structures in your garden can be sensitive to a sudden drop in temperature and change in the environment. This is why it is always a smart move to be ready.