Tag Archives: Classroom Training

Highschool students studying in a classroom

Classroom Training Ground: 3 Ways to Raise Leaders in the Classroom

Highschool students studying in a classroomThe classroom is more than a space for learning math lessons and getting hands busy on art projects — it’s the breeding environment for emerging leaders. The challenge for teachers is not to be caught up with the daily grind and forget the life and leadership lessons the youth needs to learn.

With that said, here are ways to train students to become leaders:

1. Delegate Tasks

Involve your students in little tasks, such as writing additional notes on the classroom whiteboard or maintaining a clean space in your supplies area. What you’re doing here is you’re slowly introducing to them a sense of responsibility, which is a key leadership trait.

Some students would be hesitant to take on such duties, either because they’re timid or at the flip side, too proud — two issues you need to address when you’re raising a leader.

So, don’t just delegate tasks to those who are willing to participate — engage the ones who are hesitant as well, and you might just be able to help them ‘prune’ attitudes and behaviour unbecoming of a leader.

2. Present a Problem

Problems are opportunities for leaders to step up. Whenever you have lessons that would be relevant to pressing issues in your school, say, waste management, bullying, or obesity, challenge your students about how they can contribute to fixing such problems.

Give them models of the best practices so they would have an idea on possible solutions. Acknowledge everyone’s input to boost their confidence and really own up to the challenge, but at the same time, encourage constructive criticisms on solutions proposed. You want student-leaders who think and listen.

3. Think About Collaboration

You must instill in students that leadership is all about people — collaborating with different personalities, for the most part. Your classroom then should be arranged in such a way that it would encourage students to work with one another.

Invest in high-quality, moveable school furniture, so students to allow students to reconfigure their spaces and freely talk. Dedicate zones as well where students can better do their group work. Assign a different group every now and then when cleaning up storage areas and whatnot.

Again, remember, your students are the next leaders. See them for who they are. Build them up to be the good leaders the world needs.